Posts made in September, 2013

World Heart Day | 29 September

Posted by on Sep 29, 2013 in Health Topics | 0 comments

World Heart Day  |  29 September

September 29, 2013, will mark the 14th observance of World Heart Day. Each year, the World Heart Federation sponsors this event to raise awareness that cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, is the world’s leading cause of death. The observance takes place on the last Sunday in September every year. For World Heart Day 2013, the World Heart Federation is focusing on heart health across the lifespan, beginning before birth and continuing throughout life. Many early deaths caused by heart disease and stroke are preventable, according to the World Heart Federation and the latest report from CDC Vital Signs. That’s why you should start heart-healthy habits as early as possible and continue them throughout your life. World Heart Day 2013 also focuses, as it did in 2012, on women and children. What factors contribute to Heart Health? Lifestyle factors such as lack of exercise, stress, smoking and an unhealthy diet can lead to high blood pressure and cholesterol which subsequently may cause heart disease and heart attacks. Cardiovascular disease awareness is on the map this month as the world gears up to celebrate World Heart Day on 29 September. In South Africa specifically, statistics show that about 130 heart attacks and 240 strokes occur daily. This means that 10 people suffer a stroke and five people have a heart attack every hour. source: www.health24.co.za...

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Alzheimer’s Disease

Posted by on Sep 20, 2013 in Health Topics | 0 comments

Alzheimer’s Disease

The course of Alzheimer’s disease is not the same in every person, but symptoms seem to develop over the same general stages. In most people with Alzheimer’s, symptoms first appear after age 60. Scientists now know that Alzheimer’s progresses on a spectrum with three stages—an early, preclinical stage with no symptoms; a middle stage of mild cognitive impairment (MCI); and a final stage of Alzheimer’s dementia. At this time, doctors cannot predict with any certainty which people with MCI will or will not develop Alzheimer’s. Very early signs and symptoms Memory problems are typically one of the first signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Sometimes, other thinking problems, such as trouble finding the right words or poor judgment, are most prominent early on. Mild Alzheimer’s disease As the disease progresses, memory loss worsens, and changes in other cognitive abilities are evident. Problems can include: getting lost trouble handling money and paying bills repeating questions taking longer to complete normal daily tasks poor judgment losing things or misplacing them in odd places mood and personality changes Alzheimer’s disease is often diagnosed at this stage. Moderate Alzheimer’s disease In this stage, damage occurs in areas of the brain that control language, reasoning, sensory processing, and conscious thought. Symptoms may include: increased memory loss and confusion problems recognizing family and friends inability to learn new things difficulty carrying out tasks that involve multiple steps (such as getting dressed) problems coping with new situations hallucinations, delusions, and paranoia impulsive behavior Severe Alzheimer’s disease People with severe Alzheimer’s cannot communicate and are completely dependent on others for their care. Near the end, the person may be in bed most or all of the time as the body shuts down. Their symptoms often include: inability to communicate weight loss seizures skin infections difficulty swallowing groaning, moaning, or grunting increased sleeping lack of control of bowel and bladder   Caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease is physically, emotionally, and financially challenging . The demands of day-to-day care, changing family roles, and difficult decisions about placement in a care facility can be hard to handle. Researchers have learned much about Alzheimer’s caregiving, and studies are testing new ways to support caregivers. Becoming well-informed about the disease is one important long-term strategy. Programs that teach families about the various stages of Alzheimer’s and about flexible and practical strategies for dealing with difficult caregiving situations provide vital help to those who care for people with Alzheimer’s. Good coping skills and a strong support network of family and friends also help caregivers handle the stresses of caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease. For example, staying physically active has physical and emotional benefits. Some Alzheimer’s caregivers have found that participating in a support group is a critical lifeline. Support groups allow caregivers to take a break, express concerns, share experiences, get tips, and receive emotional comfort. Many organizations sponsor in-person and online support groups , including groups for people with early-stage Alzheimer’s and their families. Support networks can be especially valuable when caregivers face the difficult decision of whether and when to place a loved one in a nursing home or assisted living facility. Source:...

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Kids Safety

Posted by on Sep 9, 2013 in Health Topics | 0 comments

Kids Safety

Kids are going to fall, crash, slip and tumble. It’s all part of being a kid, and we wouldn’t want it any other way. But there are little things we can all do to ensure that kids avoid the more serious injuries that can lead to disabilities and even death. Home — it’s where children grow and learn, the place where they find comfort, love and care. It’s where they can see, touch, explore and experience the world around them, so their minds and bodies develop properly. It’s also a place where children need to feel safe. 10. Never Leave Children Alone Near Water 9. Keep Cleaning Materials and Other Chemicals Away from Children 8. Any Firearms Should Be Unloaded and Locked Away 7. Keep Sleeping Areas as Bare as Possible, Especially for Babies 6. Cover Electrical Outlets and Protect Children from Electrical Wires 5. Keep Small Items and Food Out of Reach 4. Install a Smoke Alarm and Carbon Monoxide Detector 3. Secure Windows, Block Stairways and Lock Doors 2. Keep Children Safe Around the Family Pet 1. Be Prepared for an Emergency source: http://www.safekids.org/safetytips http://health.howstuffworks.com/pregnancy-and-parenting/10-home-safety-tips-kids.htm      ...

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