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Fight Spring allergies

Posted by on Aug 31, 2015 in Health Topics, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Fight Spring allergies

The warm days of Spring are here again and as welcome as the warmth and sunshine might be, it also signifies the start of Spring allergy season. 1. Know what you are allergic to You may think you know what’s causing your allergy symptoms, but an allergy specialist (allergist) may be able to help identify your triggers. An allergist can perform tests to pinpoint the cause of your suffering and then find the right treatment to stop it. 2. Get over-the-counter medication If you know you’re prone to sniffles and sneezes as the weather warms up, now is the time to stock up on allergy medications, don’t forget to also look in the homeopathic and natural medicine aisles for relief. But you’ll still need to see your doctor if you take prescription-only drugs to ease your allergies. 3. Wash hands frequently Develop a healthy hand hygiene routine by frequently washing hands with soap and running water for at least 30 seconds to remove clinging pollens and keep hands germ free. Don’t touch your already sensitive eyes with dirty hands and try rinsing eyes with cool water after coming indoors to help minimize the effects of pollen. Shower and wash hair at night to prevent pollens from getting into bedding. 4. Regularly cleaning your home Spring cleaning sounds like a lot of work, but ridding your home, car, office or playroom of bacteria, mold, dust and other grime can keep you free of spring colds and help you cope better with seasonal allergies. Plus, all that window washing and floor sweeping will burn some calories too. 5. Pets and allergies can go hand in hand A tip for dog or cat owners who are allergic to fur: bathe your pets frequently. Your pet’s saliva on the fur from cleaning itself or on your skin from slobbery kisses can also incite an allergy reaction. In addition to bathing your pet, remember to wash your hands soon after you’ve had direct contact with your furry friend. Although there is no real cure for seasonal allergies, it is possible to relieve symptoms and still enjoy the start of the warm season and all its beauty. Remember, frequent handwashing with warm water and soap is one of the simplest and most effective ways to stay healthy. Also cover your nose and mouth when you cough or sneeze to combat the spread of any infections. source:...

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Kids Health | Nose Bleeds

Posted by on Jan 28, 2015 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Kids Health  |  Nose Bleeds

Most nosebleeds look worse than they are. In other words, nosebleeds are messy, a little uncomfortable, and sometimes even scary, but they are usually no big deal. Kids can get nosebleeds once in a while or more often. The nosebleeds that are most common in kids usually occur near the front of the nose, on the wall separating the two sides of the nose (the septum), and usually start from just one nostril. Sometimes nosebleeds start further back in the nose, but this is rare and occurs mostly in older people or those who have high blood pressure or injuries to their nose or face. What Causes Nosebleeds? Most nosebleeds occur when little blood vessels that line the inside of your nose break and bleed. These blood vessels are very fragile and lie very close to the surface, which makes them easy targets for injury. Common reasons are: nose picking or sticking something up the nose a cold or allergy, especially with sneezing, coughing, and nose blowing dry, heated, indoor air (often occurring during winter), which causes the inside of the nose to become cracked, crusted, and itchy Less often, injuries to the outside of the nose, face, or head can cause nosebleeds. If this happens, you need to see a doctor right away. You can help prevent these types of nosebleeds by wearing protective gear, such as helmets for hockey, football, and baseball and any other sport or activity that requires them. Sometimes nosebleeds may be due to a problem with the blood’s clotting system, but this is rare. If You Get Nosebleeds You know that you should see a doctor if your nosebleed was caused by an injury, such as a punch. But what if it just starts bleeding on its own? Follow these steps: Don’t lie down. Sit up or stand. Use tissues or a damp washcloth to catch the blood. Tip your head forward (don’t lean your head back; this can make blood run down your throat). Pinch the soft part of your nose together (just below the bony part of your nose) and breathe through your mouth. Do this for 10 minutes. Make sure you hold the pressure for 10 minutes without stopping. It seems like a long time when you actually do it, so having someone check the time may help. Do not pick, rub, or blow your nose — this can cause your nose to bleed more. If your nosebleed doesn’t stop after 10 minutes of pressure, pinch it for another 10 minutes. If it still hasn’t stopped, your mom, dad, or another adult should speak with a doctor. Here are some other cases when you need to see the doctor or visit the emergency department: You feel dizzy, weak, or faint (like you might pass out). Your nose is bleeding fast or you seem to be losing a lot of blood. You just started taking a new medicine. You have other symptoms, such as unusual bruising on your body. Nixing Nosebleeds If you’d like to get fewer nosebleeds, what can you do? Well, don’t pick your nose or stick anything up your nose. Also, avoid blowing your nose too forcefully and if you have allergies that bother your nose, see a doctor about them. If you get your allergies under control, your nose probably won’t be as stuffy and irritated. When the inside of your nose feels dry and itchy, it can be tempting to pick it, so talk to your mom or dad about using one or two of these strategies to keep it moist: Use a saline (saltwater) nasal...

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Coping with Exam Stress

Posted by on Nov 7, 2013 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Coping with Exam Stress

With in full-swing now, many teenagers are facing what is, for most, the biggest challenge yet. Everyone’s individual reactions to it will be different. Many students, however, may be panicking. Follow our advice on taking exams, and reduce stress the easy way. Plan your time Draw up a realistic revision schedule and stick to it. Include some time for relaxation — it’s not healthy to constantly have your nose in a book. To maximise your concentration, break up your time into 15-minute segments, interspersed by five-minute breaks. Knowing that you have a break coming up helps to prevent you from losing interest completely. Don’t be unrealistic You’ve spent most of your life at school, and you have a good idea of what you’re capable of. If you’re an average student, you’re unlikely to suddenly jump to the top of the class. Being realistic will help prevent you (and your parents!) from being disappointed when the results come in. The key thing is to do your best. Avoid sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll (but especially drugs) Anything that can give you a high will eventually give you a low. Don’t try to deal with your stress by turning to alcohol or recreational drugs — apart from anything else, you need all the memory you can get right now! Try not to drink too much coffee either — the caffeine won’t help you to concentrate. Drinking plenty of water will keep you hydrated and your brain functioning at its best. Revise methodically Simply reading long swathes of text is not going to help you to remember facts and figures. Write out important dates, facts or passages, use lots of coloured pens and underline key phrases. Go back over these notes a day later, and then a week after that. Your memory will be better and you will feel more confident about your exams. Test yourself Test yourself or get someone to test you on your notes. Bribe a brother or sister to do it for you, or ask your parents. Testing yourself regularly means that you remember facts better and any gaps in your knowledge can be picked up in good time — making the actual exam a lot less stressful. Stick notes around your house Buy cardboard stars in bright colours from newsagents, or make some out of card. Write key facts and phrases on each and stick them around your bedroom (preferably on items where they won’t leave a mark!) in places where you’ll often see them, for example, on your mirror or inside a cupboard that you often open. After a while, these facts will sink in without any extra effort on your part. Ignore your friends Not entirely, of course! But when your mates say how much revision they’ve been doing, they might not be telling the truth. Don’t use them as a benchmark — they might not want to seem daggy for doing lots of revision, or they might not be doing enough. Know yourself and know what you have to do — you’re in this for yourself. Ask for help There are great sources of support available if you feel that you need it. Ask a teacher if you don’t understand a particular topic now that you’re revisiting it — it doesn’t have to the one who taught you if you don’t feel that they’re good at explaining things to you. School counsellors and even good old mum and dad are also great for getting worries “off your chest”. You’re not alone, so don’t feel that you have to be. Have a fall-back plan...

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